• Prominent Hominid Fossils. Visit this site for a comprehensive listing of all hominid fossils that are important either for their scientific or historic interest. Scroll down and click on any photo to see a larger image and a description of the fossil.
  • The Evidence: Hominid Fossils. Go to this University of Texas site to learn about the more important hominid fossils and what they can tell us about the evolution of humans. This is a very interesting site.
  • The Fossil Evidence for Human Evolution in China.At this site you can learn about recent discoveries in China that provide new evidence about human evolution. Click on the skull to read the article.
  • Human Evolution. Visit this site to see a proposed chart of human evolution from 5 million years ago to the present. This chart illustrates the best fit for known fossil specimens to date, but it is not accepted totally. As new fossils are found, they tend to impact thoughts about human evolution.
  • A Science Odyssey: You Try It: Human Evolution Activity. At this site you can use your mouse to move through a timeline of human evolution. You can stop at any time from 5 million years ago to the present to learn about the hominid species that may, or may not, be a part of human ancestry
  • Early Human Evolution. Visit this site by Palomar College, San Marcos, California for an online course on human evolution. Click on early transitional humans to learn more about the earliest hominid species. Then scroll down and click on nest topic to read more about Homo erectus.
  • Human Ancestry: Species. Go to this site to see a time line with the hominid species from each time period. Click on any highlighted species name to read a short article about that species. This is a very detailed and excellent site.
  • Early Human Phylogeny. At this Smithsonian Institution site you can see another time line showing the evolution of hominids over the last 5 million years. Scroll down and click on any species name to learn more about that species. Or you can click on catalog to see a particular specimen in the National Museum of Natural History’s collection.
  • New Hominid Species Complicates Early Hominid Evolution. Visit this site to read about a 3.5 million-year-old skull found in Kenya in 1998-1999. This skull is a new species called Kenyanthropus platyops. It is strikingly different from Australopithecus afarensis fossils from the same place and time period.
  • Guided Tour – Hominid Evolution. At this site you can learn about the earliest hominids and see photographs of the fossils. You can also learn more about associated topics, such as bipedalism, at this site.
  • Wiki on human evolution